Three things you can do today to increase participation on your church’s Facebook page

Three things you can do today to increase participation on your church’s Facebook page
Three things you can do today to increase participation on your church’s Facebook page

Written by cgraves

April 27, 2020

  1. In your next church newsletter, remind your parishioners to LIKE your church’s Facebook page. Provide them with a direct link to your page in the newsletter. Because so many churches have the same names, it is not always easy to locate even your own church’s page.
  2. INVITE your friends to LIKE your church’s page. Clergy can do this as can all parishioners who follow the page. To do this, go to the church’s page and click on the three dots just under the header photo next to like, follow and share (see screenshot below)

 

Click the circles next to the names of friends you’d like to invite. Facebook will show you which friends already like your page (see green checkboxes marked “liked” in screenshot below). When you are finished, click SEND INVITES at the bottom right corner of the window (see screenshot below).

 

3. Invite people who LIKE your individual posts to FOLLOW/LIKE your page. Go to your church’s Facebook page and locate the reactions to your post (see screenshot below – note: the names are mostly deleted in this screen shot for privacy). The post featured below was announcing an ordination, for example. 53 people “reacted” to the post.

 

Click on the underlined number of reactions. It will bring up a window showing you who, of the people who “reacted” to your post, does not LIKE/FOLLOW your page yet. You can invite them to do so. (See screenshot below. In this smaller post, easier for our example, 5 people “reacted” to the post.) Circled below are the people who do not already follow the page, but have “reacted” to the page’s post (names are blocked out for privacy).

There’s no guarantee your invites will be seen or accepted (mostly because people don’t always know to respond), but you will definitely get some more followers. Every one counts, and over time they add up!

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