Turning Toward the Future with Caution and Hope
A Phased Approach to Regathering as Church

In the first weeks of societal efforts to contain the novel coronavirus’ spread, we had all hoped that the most restrictive measures of social distancing and closure of non-essential business would be effective and brief. Yet in our region–that of Washington, DC, Maryland, and Virginia–both the number of lives lost and the economic impact of containment efforts continue to rise and there is, as yet, no clear end in sight.

Thus we continue to live in a suspended time of suffering and loss. Yet with quiet amazement, we’re discovering within ourselves and in our virtual communities untapped reserves of resilience and creativity. We’re heartened daily by acts of generosity and kindness and inspired by those whose quiet heroism helps to save lives and care for the most vulnerable.

The way forward is also the road of our own transformation, in the midst of a societal transformation that we can help shape by our faithfulness to the God of resurrection and hope. God is calling forth from us now far more than we could have asked for or imagined just a few months ago. If we choose to embrace this moment and learn all that we can from it, we will emerge as a stronger church, with greater capacity for faithful and fruitful ministry when this season passes.

What follows is a description of both the phased regathering of our churches and a parallel discernment of God’s call to us in this crucible time.

(Click on the images below to read the full pdf in English or Spanish. Plain text available below the images.)

The Right Rev. Mariann Edgar Budde, Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Washington
The Right Rev. Susan Goff, Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Virginia
The Right Rev. Eugene Taylor Sutton, Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Maryland

Turning Toward the Future with Caution and Hope

A Phased Approach to Regathering as Church

From the Episcopal Bishops of Maryland, Washington, DC and Virginia

May 4, 2020

In the first weeks of societal efforts to contain the novel coronavirus’ spread, we had all hoped that the most restrictive measures of social distancing and closure of non-essential business would be effective and brief. Yet in our region–that of Washington, DC, Maryland, and Virginia–both the number of lives lost and the economic impact of containment efforts continue to rise and there is, as yet, no clear end in sight.

Thus we continue to live in a suspended time of suffering and loss. Yet with quiet amazement, we’re discovering within ourselves and in our virtual communities untapped reserves of resilience and creativity. We’re heartened daily by acts of generosity and kindness and inspired by those whose quiet heroism helps to save lives and care for the most vulnerable.

People of faith are not immune to human suffering, nor are we spared anxiety or grief. What we can do, and are doing, is to draw upon the deepest wells of our biblical and theological traditions which sustain us in times like this. Like our ancestors who walked through their own valleys of the shadow of death, we call upon our God for guidance and strength. As followers of Jesus, we make our way trusting in His abiding presence and love, while we take our place among all God’s children in this uncertain time.

Since early March, our churches have responded to the abrupt end to public worship and community gatherings with creativity, goodwill, and compassion for those hardest hit by the pandemic. As your bishops, we have seen that in the midst of your own grief and disorientation you, clergy and laypersons alike, have been a calming presence for others; in your own suffering, you have offered the solace of heartfelt prayer and solidarity with others in their hour of need. Words cannot express our gratitude.

Our elected officials are beginning to make plans for gradual, phased reopening of non-essential business and easing of social distancing. Governors Hogan and Northam and Mayor Bowser have pledged to coordinate their efforts, and we, the bishops of Washington, DC, Maryland, and Virginia are committed to do the same, as we begin to plan for a gradual re-gathering of our congregations.

The hard truth is that we will not be able to welcome all people into our places of worship for the foreseeable future. Thus we must prepare for different stages of regathering, following the guidelines of civic leaders. Moreover, the process of regathering may not be uniform, but vary according to county or region, and we must also prepare for the possibility of suspending in-person gatherings again should cases of infection rise.

As the Wisconsin Council of Churches recently wrote to its member congregations,

“What future we find ourselves in depends not only on the behavior of the virus, but on the actions of people–as individuals, churches, communities, and governments. The way forward will not be a matter of following a timetable, but of faithfully discerning the signs of the times, and responding accordingly.”

The way forward is also the road of our own transformation, in the midst of a societal transformation that we can help shape by our faithfulness to the God of resurrection and hope. God is calling forth from us now far more than we could have asked for or imagined just a few months ago. If we choose to embrace this moment and learn all that we can from it, we will emerge as a stronger church, with greater capacity for faithful and fruitful ministry when this season passes.

What follows is a description of both the phased regathering of our churches and a parallel discernment of God’s call to us in this crucible time.

Levels of the Opening of Church Buildings for Worship in Response to a Public Health Emergency

Phase One: No Live In-Person Gatherings (Stay-at-Home/Most Businesses and Institutions Closed)

Church protocols under phase one

Congregations holding virtual worship, livestreamed or recorded

Bible studies, coffee hours, social gatherings, and meetings via telephone or online

Pastoral care via telephone or online

Continued ministries of service and compassion within protocols of safety

First assessments of economic impact on members of the congregations and wider community–preliminary adjustments of budgets, ministry goals

Public health indicator for phase one:

COVID-19 cases, hospitalizations and deaths are increasing

Phase Two: Significantly Limited Gatherings (Some Businesses and Institutions Reopened with Limitations)

Church protocols under phase two

*Note: All regatherings require bishop’s advance approval of the congregation’s plan

Church offices may reopen in spaces large enough for physical distance to be maintained, with the requirement that proper sanitation measures be strictly adhered to and enforced

Small indoor church worship (under 50 or number designated by civic authorities) may re-start in spaces large enough for 6 feet of physical distance to be maintained between people

Outdoor worship for limited numbers with physical distancing

Restrictive practices for celebrations of the Eucharist

Small group gatherings permitted with physical distancing

Continued health/safety protocols, including the use of masks at all gatherings.

Ongoing care for the most vulnerable, engagement with those assessing the societal impact of the pandemic and advocacy for justice

Next level assessment of pandemic’s impact on members of the congregation and community. Forecasting of necessary long-term adjustments of ministry initiatives. Exploration of collaborative partnerships

Virtual worship will still be necessary in all congregations to accommodate vulnerable populations and larger worshipping communities

Pastoral care to those in high-risk categories for contracting the virus remains restricted, particularly for clergy and lay visitors in high-risk categories

Public health indicators for phase two

14-day consecutive decline in numbers of people testing positive for covid-19, hospitalizations, and intensive care bed use

Widespread testing / contact tracing available to track the spread of the virus

Sufficient supply of personal protective equipment

Evidence that our health care systems have sufficient equipment and are not overwhelmed by the number of cases

Phase Three: Moderately Limited Gatherings (More Businesses and Institutions Reopened / Fewer Restrictions)

Church protocols with guidelines under phase three

Increased number of persons allowed for public worship, according to guidelines set by health officials

Continued physical distancing and masking requirements likely

Restrictive practices may still guide the celebration of Eucharist, with gradual easing

Restrictions eased on office/classroom gathering, within guidelines

Larger group ministries (youth groups, camps, classes) may resume within established guidelines

Continued assessments of pandemic impact and prayerful discernment of future ministry

Public health indicators for phase three

Covid-19 cases, hospitalizations and deaths have fallen to near zero

Widespread testing and tracking

Health care system well equipped and able to treat all in need

Phase Four: Unlimited Gatherings with Some Protections (All or Most Physical Restrictions Lifted)

Church protocols with guidelines under phase four

No limit to the number of worshipers who may attend, except that those who are known to be infectious, actively sick or who display any of the symptoms of being ill should not attend

Worshipers may wear masks throughout the service but masks will not be required

Sacramental worship and community gathering restrictions are lifted

Public health indicators for phase four

A vaccine has been developed and is available to all in the general public

Treatment of proven effectiveness is widely available

Testing is widespread for virus and immunity

Life after covid-19: continued adaptation to new reality: The process of reflection and adaptation has already begun. We place our hope in Christ, whose resurrection assures us that on the other side of death, there is life.

Post covid-19 church increased mission capacity

Both in-person and virtual worship

Both in-person and virtual meetings

Increased engagement in small group gatherings and widespread pastoral care

Increased online giving as well as in-person offerings

Fruitful collaborative endeavors

Right-sizing of building use and capacities to meet a growing mission field

Streamlined, efficient use of financial and other resources

Strategic efforts toward the realization of key strategic mission, vision and goals

Emergency preparedness plans and strategies in place

Each diocese will develop specific strategies and checklists for its unique situations.

 

The Right Rev. Mariann Edgar Budde, Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Washington
The Right Rev. Susan Goff, Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Virginia
The Right Rev. Eugene Taylor Sutton, Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Maryland

 

Mirando Hacia el Futuro con Precaución y Esperanza

Un Enfoque Gradual para Reunirse de nuevo como Iglesia

De los Obispos Episcopales de Maryland, Washington, DC y Virginia

May 4, 2020

Así seguimos viviendo en un tiempo suspendido de sufrimiento y pérdida. Sin embargo, con una silenciosa sorpresa, estamos descubriendo dentro de nosotros mismos y en nuestras comunidades virtuales reservas sin explotar de resiliencia y creatividad. Nos sentimos alentados diariamente por actos de generosidad e inspirados por aquellos que trabajan incansablemente para salvar vidas y cuidar a los más vulnerables.

Las personas de fe no son inmunes al sufrimiento humano, ni tampoco nos libramos de la ansiedad o el dolor. Lo que podemos hacer, y estamos haciendo, es recurrir a los pozos más profundos de nuestras tradiciones bíblicas y teológicas que nos sostienen en tiempos como este. Como nuestros antepasados que caminaron a través de sus propios valles de la sombra de la muerte, llamamos a nuestro Dios para que nos guíe y nos fortalezca. Como seguidores de Jesús, hacemos nuestro camino confiando en Su presencia y amor permanentes, mientras tomamos nuestro lugar entre todos los hijos de Dios en este tiempo incierto.

Desde principios de marzo, nuestras iglesias han respondido al abrupto fin de la adoración pública y las reuniones comunitarias con creatividad, buena voluntad y compasión por los más afectados por la pandemia. Como obispos de ustedes, hemos sido testigos de cómo, en medio de su propia aflicción y desorientación, el clero y los laicos han sido una presencia calmante para otros. En nuestro sufrimiento, habéis ofrecido el consuelo de la oración sincera y solidaridad con los demás en su hora de necesidad. Las palabras no pueden expresar adecuadamente nuestra gratitud y admiración a todos ustedes.

Nuestros funcionarios electos comienzan a hacer planes para reabrir gradualmente la ciudad, primero en fases los negocios no esenciales y facilitando 

el distanciamiento social. Los gobernadores Hogan y Northam y la Alcaldesa Bowser se han comprometido a coordinar sus esfuerzos. Nosotros, los obispos de Washington, DC, Maryland y Virginia, estamos comprometidos a hacer lo mismo cuando comenzamos a planear una reunión gradual de nuestras congregaciones.

La  difícil verdad es que no podremos dar la bienvenida a todas las personas a nuestros lugares de adoración en el futuro previsible. Así pues, debemos prepararnos para diferentes etapas para volver a reunirnos, siguiendo las directrices de los líderes cívicos. Además, el proceso de juntarnos de nuevo puede no ser uniforme, varía según el condado o la región. También debemos prepararnos para la posibilidad de suspender de nuevo las reuniones en persona si aumentan los casos de infección.

Como el Consejo de Iglesias de Wisconsin escribió recientemente a sus congregaciones miembros: “El futuro en el que nos encontramos depende no sólo del comportamiento del virus, sino de las acciones de las personas, como individuos, iglesias, comunidades y gobiernos. El camino a seguir no será solamente cuestión de seguir un calendario, sino de discernir fielmente los signos de los tiempos y responder consecuentemente”.

El camino a seguir es también el camino de nuestra propia transformación, en medio de una transformación social que podemos ayudar a dar forma por nuestra fidelidad al Dios de resurrección y esperanza. Dios nos está llamando ahora mucho más de lo que podríamos haber pedido o imaginado hace unos meses. Si elegimos abrazar este momento y aprender todo lo que podamos de él, emergeremos como una iglesia más fuerte, con mayor capacidad para un ministerio fiel y fructífero cuando este tiempo pase.

Lo que sigue es un borrador de trabajo tanto de volver a reunirnos de forma gradual en nuestras iglesias como de un discernimiento paralelo al llamado de Dios a nosotros en este tiempo crucial.

Niveles de apertura de los edificios de la Iglesia para la adoración en respuesta a una emergencia de salud pública.

Fase Uno: No hay reuniones en vivo en persona (Permanecer en casa / La mayoría de los negocios e instituciones cerradas / sin reuniones públicas)

Congregaciones que realizan adoracion virtual, streaming en directo o con videos grabados

Estudios Bíblicos, horas de café, reuniones sociales, y reuniones vía teléfono o en a través de internet

Atención pastoral vía teléfono o por internet

Continúan los ministerios de servicio y compasión dentro de protocolos de seguridad

Primeras evaluaciones del impacto económico en los miembros de las congregaciones y la comunidad en general – ajustes preliminares de presupuestos, metas ministeriales

Indicadore de salud pública

El número de enfermedades infecciosas y muertes conocidas continúa aumentando

Fase DosReuniones significativamente limitadas (algunas empresas e instituciones re-abrieron con limitaciones)

Protocolos de la iglesia con directrices en la fase dos

*Nota: Todas las re-reuniones requieren la aprobación previa del obispo/a del plan de la congregación. Cada diócesis desarrollará estrategias específicas y listas de verificación de preparación para sus congregaciones.

Las oficinas de la iglesia pueden reabrir en espacios lo suficientemente grandes como para mantener el distanciamiento social, con el requisito que las medidas de saneamiento apropiadas sean estrictamente adheridas a y forzadas

Pequeña adoración en la iglesia (menos de 50 o un número designado por las autoridades civiles) pueden reiniciarse en espacios lo suficientemente grandes como para mantener 6 pies de distancia física entre las personas

Adoración al aire libre para un número limitado con distancia física

Prácticas restrictivas para las celebraciones eucarísticas

Se permiten reuniones en grupos pequeños con distancia física y usando máscaraphysical distancing

Continuación de los protocolos de salud/seguridad, incluido el uso de máscaras

Atención continua para los más vulnerables, compromiso con los que evalúan el impacto social de la pandemia y defensa de la justicia

Evaluación del siguiente nivel del impacto de la pandemia en los miembros de la congregación, la comunidad, y la previsión de los ajustes necesarios a largo plazo de las iniciativas ministeriales. Exploración de asociaciones de colaboración

La adoración virtual será necesaria en todas las congregaciones para las poblaciones vulnerable

Cuidado pastoral a aquellos en categorías de alto riesgo para contraer el virus sigue siendo restringida, particularmente para el clero y los visitantes laicos en categorías de alto riesgo

Indicadores de salud pública

Disminución consecutiva de 14 días en el número de personas que han obtenido resultados positivos del COVID-19, hospitalizaciones, y uso de camas de cuidados intensivos

Pruebas/seguimiento de contactos generalizado disponibles para realizar un seguimiento de la propagación del virus

Suficiente suministros de equipos de protección personal

Pruebas de que nuestros sistemas de atención sanitaria cuentan con equipos suficientes y no se ven abrumados por el número de casos

Fase Tres: Reuniones moderadamente limitadas (Más empresas e instituciones reabiertas W/menos restricciones)

Protocolos de la iglesia con directrices en la fase tres

Aumento del número de personas permitidas para la adoración pública, de acuerdo con las directrices establecidas por los funcionarios de salud

Requisitos continuos de distancia social y enmascaramiento probables

Las prácticas restrictivas pueden seguir guiando la celebración de la Eucaristía, con una relajación gradual

Restricciones suavizadas en la reunión de oficina/aula, dentro de las directrices

Los ministerios de grupos más grandes (grupos juveniles, campamentos, clases) pueden reanudarse dentro de las directrices establecidas

Evaluaciones continuas del impacto pandémico y discernimiento en oración del futuro del ministerio.

Indicadores de salud pública

Casos de COVID-19, hospitalizaciones y muertes han caído a casi cero

Pruebas y seguimiento generalizados

Sistema de atención médica bien equipado y capaz de tratar a todos los necesitados

Fase Cuatro: Reuniones ilimitadas con algunas protecciones (todas o más restricciones físicas levantadas) 

Protocolos de la iglesia en la fase cuatro

No hay límite para el número de laicos que pueden asistir al servicio, excepto de aquellos que se sabe que si son infecciosos, enfermos activos o que muestran cualquiera de los síntomas de estar enfermo no deben asistir

Los adoradores pueden usar máscaras durante todo el servicio, pero no se requerirán máscaras

Se levantan las restricciones de la adoración sacramental y de la reunión comunitaria

Indicadores de salud pública

Se ha desarrollado una vacuna y está disponible para todo el público en general

El tratamiento tiene una eficacia comprobada y está ampliamente disponible

Las pruebas para el virus y la inmunidad están ampliamente difundidas.

La vida después del COVID-19: Continuación de la adaptación a la nueva realidad: El proceso de reflexión y adaptación ya ha comenzado. Nosotros ponemos nuestra esperanza en Cristo, cuya resurrección nos asegura que al otro lado de la muerte, hay vida. Oramos para que Dios guíe nuestros pasos ahora para que en el futuro volvamos a mirar nuestra fidelidad en este momento con gratitud.

iglesia después del covid-19 aumento de la capacidad de la misión

Adoración en persona y virtual

Reuniones en persona y virtuales

Mayor participación en reuniones de grupos pequeños y atención pastoral generalizada

Increased online giving as well as in-person offerings

Aumento de las ofrendas por medios electrónicos, así como las ofrendas en persona

Right-sizing of building use and capacities to meet a growing mission field

Aumento de las ofrendas por medios electrónicos, así como las ofrendas en persona

Usaremos los edificios de tamaño adecuado y capacidades para satisfacer las misiones

Utilización eficiente y racionalizada de los recursos financieros y de otro tipo

Esfuerzos estratégicos hacia la realización de la misión estratégica clave, visión y objetivos

Planes y estrategias de preparación para emergencias

Cada diócesis desarrollará estrategias específicas y listas de verificación para sus situaciones únicas.

 

La Rvdma. Mariann Edgar Budde, Obispa de la Diócesis Episcopal de Washington
La Rvdma. Susan Goff, Obispa de la Diócesis Episcopal de Virginia
El Rvdmo. Eugene Taylor Sutton, Obispo de la Diócesis Episcopal de Maryland