Reparations Task Force in action: formation and discernment

Reparations Task Force in action: formation and discernment

The Diocesan Reparations Task Force continues to meet monthly to learn more about reparations and discern processes for sharing funds. The past two meetings of the task force have involved relationship building among committee members, Biblical and historical background on reparations and societal anti-black racism practices, as well as discussion of Scripture relating to slavery and reparations.

Like the journey to reparations in our country, there are many steps along the path to forming a way to reparations in our diocese. In September of 2020, our diocese passed a resolution creating a task force to oversee a $1 million endowment seed fund for reparations. There are many roads the journey can take on determining a process for reparations that meets our diocesan, faith and spiritual priorities.

There can be no love without justice and no justice without some form of repairing an injustice. As we continue to move into a deeper understanding of God’s mandate to proclaim “the message of reconciliation to which God has called us as ambassadors for Christ,” (II Corinthians 5:18-20) much like in our Baptismal Covenant, we must understand this message deeply so that we can live it fully.

Please keep the task force in your prayers as they do the hard work of developing a plan for reparations.

 

The Rev. Nancy Hennessy and Mr. Stephen Gibson
Co-chairs, Diocesan Reparations Task Force

 

 

Stories from our Truth and Reconciliation blog

Report calls church to address harms of white supremacy, colonial and imperial legacies; create $2 million healing coalition

Report calls church to address harms of white supremacy, colonial and imperial legacies; create $2 million healing coalition

“The coalition is a vehicle to affirm and coordinate so much good work already happening throughout the church,” Kitagawa said in the press release announcing the report. “It will help the church to begin much-needed structural and cultural changes in our quest to build the Beloved Community.”

Sutton Scholars take part in Martin Luther King, Jr. Day of Service

Sutton Scholars take part in Martin Luther King, Jr. Day of Service

In honor of Martin Luther King Day, our Sutton Scholars participated in a virtual day of service, which included: A screening of the Spike Lee film, 4 Little Girls, which documented the bombing of 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, AL on September 15, 1963. The Rev. Kathy Shahinian and the Rev. Linda Boyd (from our Maryland Episcopal Public Policy Network) facilitated a conversation with the Scholars about the power of youth advocacy.

A message on Juneteenth from the Diocesan Truth and Reconciliation Commission

A message on Juneteenth from the Diocesan Truth and Reconciliation Commission

Juneteenth is an opportunity to tell and retell the story of the consequences of racism and the ongoing struggle for Black and Brown people; indeed for ALL racial minorities in a nation that is so often willing to ignore, if not deny, the reality of structural and pervasive racism. Black and Brown people have suffered generations of trauma, physical violence, and deaths, and exclusion from fair opportunities for economic growth and the full participation in the benefits of citizenship.  

St. Paul’s, Prince Frederick hosts vaccine clinics, community conversations

St. Paul’s, Prince Frederick hosts vaccine clinics, community conversations

As a result of the second clinic, St. Paul’s and Communion Way of the Cross Church are now engaged in conversation with the Calvert Health Department to partner in communication about services available, as well as exploring ways to provide spaces and events to aid in community health. For St. Paul’s this falls directly into the purview of our mission statement: “We believe that through our Baptism, Christ calls the Church to be a place of healing, wholeness and hope.”

A Message from the Right Rev. Eugene Taylor Sutton on the Verdict in the Derek Chauvin Trial

A Message from the Right Rev. Eugene Taylor Sutton on the Verdict in the Derek Chauvin Trial

We know that we need good policing in our communities. We honor and respect those police officers and other first responders who put their lives on the line every day to serve and protect us. The overwhelming majority of them are good people, and we pray for their safety and the courage to perform their duties for the common good. But we need them also to have the courage to call out and challenge the racist language and practices of the few that mar the good name of the many faithful servants – much like so many did in the George Floyd trial, including the Minneapolis Police Chief and several other officers.